Where People Feast

An Indigenous People's Cookbook

By (author) Dolly Watts and Annie Watts


Price: $21.95 USD $24.95 CAD
ISBN: 9781551522210
EPUB ISBN: 9781551522906 (check your favourite retailer)
Availability: In Stock. Usually ships in 24 hours.
About this book

Gourmand Award winner for Best Local Cuisine Book (Canada).
Finalist for ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year Award in the Cooking cateogry.

The food traditions of North America's indigenous peoples are centuries-old and endure to this day. Feasts that include a bounty of land and sea are the focal point of celebrations and ceremonies; for many, food is what connects them to family, community, and the afterlife. Where People Feast, one of the few indigenous cookbooks available, focuses on Canadian west coast Native cuisine, which takes advantage of the area's abundant seafood, game, fruits, and vegetables―with ingredients both exotic (oolichan, venison, grouse) and common (salmon, crab, berries).

Dolly Watts and her daughter Annie are from the Gitk'san First Nation in British Columbia, and are the proprietors of the Liliget Feast House in Vancouver, the only First Nations fine dining establishment of its kind. For almost two decades, Dolly and (later) Annie have focused on serving Native cuisine that is both traditional and modern; while many recipes are steeped in history, others are contemporary takes that acknowledge other cuisines both near and far.

The book includes 16 full-colour photographs, and 120 delectable dishes that can be easily replicated by chefs at home; the authors also offer plenty of handy suggestions and substitution ideas. For Dolly and Annie, Where People Feast is the culmination of a lifetime's work dedicated to introducing people to the extraordinary foods that are truly North American.

Recipes include Smoked Salmon Mousse, Indian Tacos, Venison Meatballs, Alder-Grilled Breast of Pheasant, Blackberry-Glazed Beets, Wild Rice Pancakes, Seaweed and Salmon Roe Soup, and Wild Blueberry Cobbler.


Now in its 2nd printing!

Reviews
It rocks!
―Shelagh Rogers, CBC, Sounds Like Canada

A chapter on smoking and preserving offers a closer historical look at indigenous culinary traditions. As one of the few titles on the topic, the Watts' book is recommended.
Library Journal

The mother-daughter team who ran the Liliget Feast House share traditional and modern aboriginal recipes, including methods for smoking and drying wild game, preparing seafood, and preserving berries. The original 100-mile diet!
Shared Vision (Editor's Pick)

The cookbook is elegant.... The photos provide stunning visuals of the food. I'm impressed with the wide variety of recipes and different kinds of foods, from Hot Buttered Halibut to Juniper Berry Sauce and Bannock.
The Homemaking Cottage (homemakingcottage.com)

Through easy-to-follow recipes, the Watts give readers an excuse to raid the market and prepare dishes such as Venison Roast with Juniper Berry Rub, Wild Huckleberry Glazed Duck, and a Pacific Northwest favorite, clam chowder.... In a truly fitting tribute to the restaurant they once owned, the pair has put together an impressive collection of recipes.
Northwest Palate

This book is appropriately named, because "feast" is exactly what I wanted to do after reading it.
Victoria Times-Colonist

Filled with delicious and unusual recipes guaranteed to whet your appetite for outstanding Aboriginal cuisine.... Where People Feast is a must-have for every Canadian kitchen.
Western Native News

A glowing shard of the continent's aboriginal past can be found in Where People Feast, which not only is that rare bird, a Native Indian cookbook, but also provides considerable guidance on how to deal with such game meats as venison, elk, and buffalo.
San Francisco Bay Guardian

A fascinating culinary history conveyed through a collection of Pacific Northwest indigenous dishes.
Georgia Straight

Where People Feast is a handsome volume, with stylish food photographs and carefully crafted recipes.... Whether traditional or contemporary, all preparations are imbued with two crucial ingredients: generosity and love.
Indian Country

There's something for traditionalists as well as Canadian cooking enthusiasts.
Homemakers

Alongside recipes for bannock and desserts made from sopalali berries, the Gitksan authors share with readers their rich aboriginal cutlure.
Soar Magazine

More Information
News

FORTHCOMING TITLES ...